Vancouver In Microscale – Fairmont Hotel

Advertisement

This post may contains affiliate links. If you use these links to buy something we may earn a commission. Thanks.

As part of our Microscale coverage, we’re focusing on our homebase of Vancouver, BC. We discovered Flickr user Thad Jantzi who created a series of Vancouver landmarks in amazing detail.

In this post, I’ll have a look at his work on the Fairmont Hotel.

From our friends at Wikipedia: The Fairmont Hotel Vancouver, formerly and still informally called the Hotel Vancouver, is a historic hotel in Vancouver, British Columbia. Located along West Georgia Street the hotel is situated within the city’s Financial District, in Downtown Vancouver. The hotel was designed by two architects, John Smith Archibald, and John Schofield. The hotel is currently managed by Fairmont Hotels and Resorts.

Opened in May 1939, the Châteauesque-styled building is considered one of Canada’s grand railway hotels. The hotel stands 112.47-metre-tall (369.0 ft), and contains 17 floors. It was the tallest building in Vancouver until the completion of TD Tower in 1972.

As you can see in the gallery below, Thad used Sand Green to emulate the steeply pitched copper roof, using a variety of elements to get the spires and dormers correct.

The body of the hotel appears to be the bottoms of various bricks in grey to emulate the windows. Thad’s done a great job of varying the depth of these to give us the different balconies and variations we see in the hotel itself.

Thad has also captured the throughlane where you can get valet parking out of Vancouver’s notoriously rainy weather.

Unfortunately Thad hasn’t been active on social media in quite a while. His Flickr account has no uploads since November 2021 after a couple of years of silence so hopefully he’s building some new Vancouver landmarks for us.

Keep an eye out for articles about more of his work, coming soon.


Consider supporting Brick Brains by purchasing your LEGO from LEGO.com using our affiliate links.
We get a small percentage of the purchase total and it doesn’t change the price you pay.